Monthly Archives: November 2015

I Can’t Say It Enough…

…good estate planning requires advice from more than one discipline.

I was talking this morning with a friend of mine who is an estate planner.  I haven’t known him for a long time, but I like his approach, and I think it differentiates him from other financial planners I’ve known, because he’s got a passion that you can’t really fake, and it is clearly about doing the right thing for the client.  In this case, it means that he spends a considerable amount of time helping clients protect what they already have before he talks to them about using the wealth they have to accumulate more to fund whatever their end goal is.

I’ve been doing this long enough to understand that not everyone is wealthy, but I think that most people want to build what wealth they have.  Sure, some people have come to see me about their estate planning because they have gotten the bad news from a doctor, and that distant inevitability is now an impending certainty.  A holistic approach is probably not foremost in their minds, but an awful lot of people I’ve represented have more wealth than they think they do, and when we sort that out as part of the process, it often requires consulting with other professionals.  Granted, if we’re doing the estate planning because someone has stage four cancer, then we aren’t likely to be talking with them about life insurance, but we might be talking with them about brokerage accounts, 401(k)s, individual retirement accounts, and their interests in closely-held corporations and LLCs, which means that we will be talking  about transfer-on-death or payable-on-death designations on accounts, and how those designations can impact their estates, which means that we will be talking with their financial planners.  We will be talking about potential tax consequences for various potential courses of action, which means that we will be talking with CPA’s and accountants.  And sometimes, I even end up talking to representatives of charities about gifts that clients want to make.  When I am doing this for the clients who know that they aren’t long for this world, I’m not just sad for the client’s approaching demise.  I’m sad for the opportunities that they lost by not acting sooner.  Sometimes, this is because of procrastination, and sometimes, it’s because people don’t understand that estate planning shouldn’t be a mass of disjointed pieces, but a comprehensive plan, focused on the goals they rate as most important, and executed with a series of coordinated steps which have been considered and mapped out with the assistance of a team of professionals who want to help them succeed.  Once I help clients to fully understand this approach, I don’t often end up having  conversations about cost, because they understand that compared to the return they can achieve, the cost is minimal.

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Filed under Pieces of the puzzle, Planning, Probates and Estates, The Practice

The Bad News Is…

One of the things that law school didn’t really prepare me for was the clients who you can’t help.

When I first started practicing law, I was eager to help clients and potential clients, and there was one who stands out in my memory as the first one I couldn’t help.  He had cosigned on a car for a relative, who had defaulted, and he came to see me, because the bank had come calling on him.  I saw nothing in the documents or the circumstance he described that would permit me to be of any meaningful assistance, but I was slightly worried that he might try to hurt me after I told him that I couldn’t help him.

He was very deliberate as he pushed back from the table, and left the room, never saying a word, and his jaw set like a rock.  After my initial relief at not having to dodge a punch or three wore off, I recall thinking “Well, that’s one person whom I’ll never see again.”

But I was wrong.

Before I moved on from that firm, the man came back to see me two more times.  The next time I met with him, he had a contract he wanted me to review before he would decide whether or not to sign it.  I was delighted that he consulted with me first.  I read through the document, noted a few points that I though he should be aware of, which prompted him to tell me that he was going to think about it before deciding to sign or not.  After wrapping up my notes, I looked up and said “Can I ask you something?”

He smiled and said “Let me guess.  You want to know why I came back.”

I nodded my head and said “Yes.  I could tell you were pretty upset when you left last time.”

He laughed and said “You’re not wrong, but I will tell you that I wasn’t upset with YOU.  In fact, I liked the way that you didn’t sugar coat it, even though you didn’t like telling me that there was nothing you could do.  You were honest with me, you didn’t waste my time, and you told me what I did wrong without making me feel stupid.  I knew I had found someone I could trust, and that makes you worth the money you charge.”

I saw him one more time, when I wrote a Will and powers of attorney for him.  Again, he expressed his thanks for the straightforward advice, and the no-nonsense approach.  I still think of him often, because I still encounter people whom I can’t help.  I won’t say that it’s easier telling clients this now than it was then, but I find that by trying to be respectful of their time, and by trying to not make them feel stupid because they made a mistake, I give them something of value, even if it was only allowing them to leave with the dignity they had when they walked in to my office.  Not everyone reacts well to such news, but I have managed to keep a few of them as clients because I approached their problems in this manner, which turns a negative into a much larger positive.

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Filed under Contracts and Agreements, Empathy, Logic Isn't Always The Life Of The Law, Pieces of the puzzle, Planning, The Practice, Wills