Initiative 594’s Inheritance Trap

I-594 isn’t just a compounding of previous violations of the Second Amendment, it is also fraught with traps for the unwary, including one for those who inherit pistols. The language in question is as follows: (4) This section does not apply to: (g) A person who (i) acquired a firearm other than a pistol by the operation of law upon the death of the former owner of the firearm of (ii) acquired a pistol by operation by operation of law upon the death of the former owner of the pistol within the preceding sixty-day period, the person must either have lawfully transferred the pistol or must have contacted the department of licensing to notify the department that he or she has possession of the pistol and intends to retain possession of the pistol in compliance with all federal and state laws. This means that as part of the probate process, the Personal Representative/Administrator of the estate and the attorney need to determine as soon as possible if the deceased owned pistols.  If no one checks, and the designee or heir takes possession without following these steps, then they have broken the law…even if it is the spouse of the deceased.  What can make an error a travesty is that the transfer or notification to the Department of Licensing must take place for every pistol that is acquired, meaning that if someone inherits more than one pistol, and doesn’t follow these steps, they may now be convicted of a misdemeanor for the first pistol, and a felony for each subsequent one. As a practical matter, if you are actually planning ahead, and you want to leave your pistols to someone, you should probably discuss this requirement with the intended recipient, and put language in your Will requiring your Personal Representative to make sure that these steps are followed, and to name a backup recipient if your first choice cannot pass a background check, or has had their concealed weapons permit revoked.

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Filed under Pieces of the puzzle, Planning, Probates and Estates, The Practice

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